12th century

Life Begins at 42: Saint Hildegard’s Guide to Becoming a Midlife Powerfrau

Posted on Feb 23, 2016 in 12th century, BLOG, hildegard of bingen, history | Comments Off

  We live in a youth-obsessed culture. The cosmetic industry pushes wrinkle creams and hair dye on us while celebrities resort to Botox and surgery to preserve an illusion of eternal girlhood. We live longer than ever before, yet advancing age, once a mark of honour, has become a source of shame. But what happens when women embrace midlife as an inner awakening and call to power? One such woman was Saint Hildegard von Bingen (1098-1179), powerfrau and late bloomer par excellence. Her youth was dire. Offered to the Church at the age of eight, she was entombed in an anchorage. Though she...

Read More

Women & the Crusades: guest post by Nan Hawthorne

Posted on Aug 4, 2011 in 12th century, crusades, guest post, hildegard of bingen, nan hawthorne, women's history | Comments Off

Women & the Crusades: guest post by Nan Hawthorne

Today’s guest post is by Nan Hawthorne, whose new novel Beloved Pilgrim explores the Crusade of 1101 from the perspective of a woman who went off to fight. During my own research of Hildegard von Bingen, I uncovered this short description of female crusaders from the Disibodenberg Chronicles, written by the monks of the abbey of Disibodenberg where Hildegard lived from the age of eight as a child anchorite: Not only men and boys, but many women also took part in this journey. Indeed females went forth on this venture dressed as men and marched in armour . . . –From the...

Read More

Mary Frith: the Original Roaring Girl

Posted on Apr 3, 2011 in 17th century theatre, london, outlaws | Comments Off

Behind Thomas Middleton and Thomas Dekker’s sparkling stage comedy, The Roaring Girl, (ca 1607-1610), was a real woman, the notorious Mary Frith, aka Moll Cutpurse—a cross-dressing, hard-drinking pickpocket, fence, and Queen of Misrule. The vintner bet Moll £20 that she would not ride from Charing Cross to Shoreditch astraddle on horseback, in breeches and doublet, boots and spurs. The hoyden took him up in a moment, and added of her own devilry a trumpet and banner. She set out from Charing Cross bravely enough, and a trumpeter being an unwonted spectacle, the eyes of all the town were...

Read More

Interview with Katherine Howe!

Posted on Jun 2, 2010 in daughters of the witching hill, katherine howe, pendle witches, physick book of deliverance dane, salem witches, witchcraft | 1 comment

This interview is published on Amazon.com. Katherine Howe is the bestselling author of The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane and a descendant of both Elizabeth Proctor, who survived the Salem witch trials, and Elizabeth Howe, who did not. Read her interview with Mary Sharratt, author of Daughters of the Witching Hill: Katherine Howe: I am so looking forward to learning more about Daughters of the Witching Hill. As I started the book, I was curious about something. The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane covers some well-worn territory in American history: the Salem witch trials, which we all...

Read More